29 October 2021

Global, regional, and national dengue burden from 1990 to 2017

Zeng, Z et al. Global, regional, and national dengue burden from 1990 to 2017: A systematic analysis based on the global burden of disease study 2017. EClinicalMedicine. 2021; 32: 100712. doi: 10.1016/j.eclinm.2020.100712

mat-40_global-regional-and-national-dengue-burden-from-1990-to-2017-full

The global burden of dengue is high, but poorly quantified and likely under-reported.

Using the methods of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors study, Zeng et al. characterized the dengue burden in 195 countries and territories between 1990 and 2017.

Over the study period, the age-standardized, global incidence (/100,000 population) more than tripled, from 431.6 in 1990 to 1371.3 in 2017. In 2017, dengue was most prevalent in South and Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean: Barbados, Dominica and Indonesia having the highest incidence of all. Almost three million disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were lost to dengue in 2017: an over 100% increase since 1990 that has disproportionately affected males. Mirroring incidence, the burden was highest in South and Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.

Almost three million disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were lost to dengue in 2017: an over 100% increase since 1990

Compared with 1990, annual dengue deaths increased from just under 17,000 to over 40,000 in 2017, and the global age-standardized mortality rate increased from 0.31 to 0.53. However, the highest age-standardized rates were for the young (0–1 years), and elderly (>80 years).

These results show increasing trends in global dengue incidence, DALYs and mortality.

The authors suggest that these findings should highlight to policymakers the importance of this problem and inform cost-effective interventions in the countries most affected.

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/eclinm/article/PIIS2589-5370(20)30456-9/fulltext



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